Get Rid of Your Leftover Pain Medications to Help Fight the Opioid Crisis

The National Zip-Out Unused Opioids Foundation is a tax exempt 501(c)(3) organization.

The opioid problem in the United States is well-documented and has reached epidemic proportions. Unused prescriptions have proved to be a significant source of drugs supplying the nation’s opioid epidemic, but the National Zip-Out Unused Opioids Foundation seeks to change that. Our goal is to educate the public on an easy method to responsibly dispose of unused pain medications. Click here to visit our FAQs page to learn more about how unused pain medications contribute to the opioid crisis.

Follow These Three Steps to Dispose Unused Pain Medications:

  1. Place your pills in a zip close plastic bag.
  2. Put dish soap in the bag until it completely coats the pills.
  3. Throw the bag away, as the dish soap will dissolve the pills and render them useless.

Watch this video for a simple and inexpensive solution for disposing of unused pain medications:

 

We urge you to click here or the image below to download a PDF of the Zip Our Opioids rack card that shows the simple and inexpensive solution for disposing of unused pain medications.

The Centers for Disease Control has reported that 64,070 drug overdose deaths in 2016 were attributed to opioid abuse, a 21% increase over 2015.  A 2012 study showed that 86% of intravenous heroin users had previously misused opioid pain relievers.

Research by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration found that nearly 70% of people surveyed obtained their most recently used pain reliever or sedative divergently from a friend or family member. This means it’s crucial for those who have been prescribed opioid pain medications to dispose of them responsibly so they stay out of the hands of people who don’t need them and could potentially become addicted.

Overdose_Deaths_Involving_Opioids,_United_States,_2000-2015
Overdose Deaths Involving Opioids, United States, 2000–2015. Deaths per 100,000 population. Source: U.S. CDC